Shade may not protect you from UV Harm

Posted: July 25, 2010 by Rach in Pergolas / Gazebos / Sun Shades
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Photo courtesy of Ann J P

Recently in Spain a number of research tests were conducted by the Universidad de Valencia and the University of Tasmania to determine how much ultra violet (UV) radiation passed through a beach umbrella to the recipient below.  The tests involved placing a UV sensor in the shade of the umbrella and recording the UV readings.  The results showed that only 4 percent of UV passed through the umbrella. In any other test 96 percent would have been considered a great result, but in this case the answer is no.

The reason is that UV exposure is not only measured by what we experience directly, but that which is reflected or scattered by air molecules can decrease our 96 percent result down to 66 percent. Which means we are still at risk.

Putting up sun shades in your back garden are a fantastic way to greatly reduce the amount of UV exposure and are strongly recommended.  However it is also important to note that while a sun shade will be bigger than an umbrella, it is unlikely to provide full protection to your family.  Always put on sun screen, wear a t-shirt and a hat even when staying in the shade in order to protect yourself and your family from harmful UV.

More information on this report which was run as a news story ‘Beach shades will not keep off the sun’s deadly rays” in the Daily Mirror, UK can be found on the English National Health Service website.

For a range of Sun Shades to see the DIY Bargain Bin Pergolas, Gazebos and Sun Shades section.

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